If you find a hedgehog outside during the day, especially if it is a warm day and they are spread out strangely, it’s likely the hedgehog has hypothermia. In this position, they are trying to gain some warmth from the sun. Hedgehogs are nocturnal animals, so seeing one during the day is a clear sign that something is wrong.

Handling

Hedgehogs have natural and very effective protection in their spines, so you’ll need something thick over your hands to pick them up. A pair of sturdy gardening gloves, leather gloves, or an old towel will be the best tool to use to pick them up. They will likely be terrified, so be gentle and slow at this stage,

Warming Up

Wrap the hedgehog up in a towel and place in a large, deep box. Fill a water bottle with hot but not boiling water and place under the towel, so that the hedgehog can start warming up slowly.

Hydrating

Make sure there is plenty of space in the box you’ve provided. Place a water bowl for the hedgehog to drink from. Do this before attempting to give it any food, and monitor how much it drinks.

Feeding

If the hedgehog drinks a lot of water it may be dehydrated, so don’t attempt to give it any food. Call a hedgehog centre to see if you should give any food, such as dry dog or cat food, and only a little.

Monitoring

Keep an eye on the hedgehog, changing the hot water bottle when needed. Gently inspect it for any fleas or ticks once it has become used to you.

Seeking Further Help

If it doesn’t seem to improve, contact a nearby hedgehog or wildlife centre. It’s a good idea to get in contact to ask for advice, and you may be able to treat it on your own. If it unfortunately worsens, you may need to take it in.